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Colours can define an era. When you think of the ’70s, it’s likely that your mind is filled with yellows and earthy oranges, while the ’80s is synonymous with Miami pinks. Here is how our colour trends have changed over the decades. One thing that has remained the same, is the high quality paint, Crown trade paints have been offering since 1777.


How colour trends
have changed over time

Colours can define an era. When you think of the '70s, it’s likely that your mind is filled with yellows and earthy oranges, while the '80s is synonymous with Miami pinks. Here is how our colour trends have changed over the decades. One thing that has remained the same, is the high quality paint, Crown trade paints have been offering since 1777.

1960s: Where radical colours roamed free

The 1960s were a time of immense social change and this was reflected in our radical approach to home décor. Colourful, psychedelic colours were popular and the more they clashed, the better.

Desert and avocado colours were used recklessly against neon oranges and fuchsias alongside pop art prints and patterns. It was a time where experimentation was at the heart of colour choices and the bolder you could go, the better.

1970s: The rise of the colourful bathroom

The 1970s were all about returning to nature. Woody brown hues and stone shades were mixed with mottled prints and dark paintwork. Yellow, burnt orange and harvest golds were also extremely popular colours and tied into the folky trends that were developing in music and fashion.

The colour palettes in our bathrooms were a similarly gaudy affair with fern greens and earthy oranges being everywhere. And we mean EVERYWHERE.

1980s: When Miami vice was everyone’s style inspiration

The vibrant fashion choices of the '80s were also reflected in home décor. Colourful pastels were sought after with Miami-style pinks and turquoises being common choices for living spaces and bedrooms. More was definitely more rather than less and it was common to match coloured leather sofas and sweeping drapes with paintwork choices.

Peach walls with pine wood and busy fabric prints were also popular interior styles for kitchens. But bathrooms didn’t stray too far away from where they were in the '70s. Colourful bathrooms were still all the rage and it was fashionable to match the tub, toilet and sink ceramics with pink or mint green paintwork.

1990s: Terracotta walls and floral borders

The 1990s were all about rustic shades and country influences. One of the most popular trends was Tuscan-inspired décor with dark brown furnishings paired with earthy beiges on our walls. Terracotta kitchens and accent walls were all the rage alongside sage green woodwork for that shabby chic look.

The '90s was also the decade where abstract and floral border wallpaper was the height of class. These were often used around the middle of the room to separate two complementary paint colours with purples and yellows being popular palettes for children’s rooms.

2000s: When beige was king

The 2000s was a decade of bold fashion statements and colour choices. But in our homes, we preferred to stick with warm tan and beige colour palettes alongside as much stainless steel as we could get our hands on.

We also loved a good feature wall in our bedrooms and living spaces with deep, ruby reds being the shade of choice alongside white paintwork. While in bathrooms, we saw a resurgence in coastal colours with sea blues and pine shades proving popular.

2010s to the present day: The rise of rose gold

Colour trends in the 2010s have swayed towards minimalist shades. The most sought after colour trends at the moment combine pastel colours with natural greens that go well with our fashionable succulents and houseplants. However, the more daring amongst us might also opt for matt greys, greens and navy blues for sophisticated yet rustic kitchen designs.

But the most popular shades of the 2010s have got to be rose gold and millennial pink. These iconic shades have become social media superstars and their universal appeal means that they’re now popular choices for pretty much every room in the house.